News New Permit Rules Coming For Import And Export Of Rare Plants And Animals

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New permit rules coming for import and export of rare plants and animals
2nd December 2020

By Justine Thompson

With less than a month to go until the end of the Transition Period, the government is urging businesses and consumers to check online guidance around importing and exporting products that are covered by the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES).
 
CITES is an international agreement that protects more than 37,000 species of animals and plants, including both live specimens and products made from their parts.
 
It covers a wide range of products, including some plants and livestock such as reptiles and birds of prey.
 
Businesses and individuals based in Great Britain who are planning on moving livestock and plants should first check to see if they are included in the CITES species list.
 
If so, they will need documentation from the Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA) in order to be legally transported between Great Britain and Northern Ireland and Great Britain and the EU from January 1, 2021.
 
Emma Biggs, APHA head of international trade and customer service centres said: “CITES plays a leading role in ensuring that international trade does not threaten the survival of endangered species in the wild.
 
“People who are planning on moving either animal or plant products into or out of Great Britain from January 1 should check online guidance on CITES products before arranging travel and apply for documentation if needed.”
 
Goods and livestock covered by CITES must have the relevant documentation and travel through one of the 29 designated UK Points of Entry and Exit (PoE).
A full list of UK land, sea and air ports alongside further information on how to apply for a permit can be found on Gov.UK.
 
Those who plan to move CITES products outside of Great Britain should also check the requirements of the intended import country with the relevant management authorities on the CITES National Authorities page.
 
A government spokesperson said: “The government remains committed to protecting nature and biodiversity whilst also minimising disruption for businesses at the end of the Transition Period. You can contact APHA for support with trading or moving endangered animals or plants listed under CITES.”