Don T Let Hedgehogs Miss Out On Superfood

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Don’t let hedgehogs miss out on ‘superfood’
7th June 2018

By Karen Pickwick
Spike’s World animal nutritionist Jennifer Dean
 
A new ‘superfood’ for humans should not be neglected in the diet of hedgehogs, animal experts have said.
 
Mealworms, which are being advocated for human consumption at the dinner table, will also boost a hedgehog’s development when fed in moderation, according to nutritionists.
 
Containing a high level of fat, they support hedgehogs to get the balanced intake they need all year round, including during the crucial autumn into winter feeding stage, according to Spike’s World.
 
The company says mealworms, the larval form of the mealworm beetle, should not be fed in isolation but as part of a balanced diet.
 
They can be found in Spike’s World Insect Crumble and WildThings Hedgehog Food products, which are widely available across the UK.
 
Animal nutritionist Jennifer Dean said: “Mealworms have been getting a bad press in isolated quarters, but they have a lot going for them as part of a hedgehog’s balanced diet.
 
“They are high in both fat and protein, meaning they contain many of the essential nutrients needed for good hedgehog health across all four seasons.
 
TREAT
 
“Mealworms are a treat food for hedgehogs and should not be given in excess as not to encourage them to refuse the rest of the ration, which could cause mineral imbalance. But our carefully created formula means that the level of mealworms should not cause any such imbalance.”
 
Spike’s World guarantees the content of Insect Crumble and WildThings Hedgehog Food is in line with recommendations around the calcium-phosphorus ratio.
 
Available hedgehog food includes Spike’s Dinner, Spike’s Meaty Feast, Spike’s Tasty Semi-Moist and Spike’s Dinner – Food for Pet Hedgehogs.
 
Spike’s World is part of Lancashire-based Pets Choice, which has been producing pet food since 1861, and today caters for dogs, cats, hedgehogs, chickens, ducks, swans and small mammals such as hamsters and rabbits.